Home > Papers from 2012 > Bees learning to discriminate painting types

Bees learning to discriminate painting types

Abstract ” Honeybees (Apis mellifera) have remarkable visual learning and discrimination abilities that extend beyond learning simple colours, shapes or patterns. They can discriminate landscape scenes, types of flowers, and even human faces. This suggests that in spite of their small brain, honeybees have a highly developed capacity for processing complex visual information, comparable in many respects to vertebrates. Here, we investigated whether this capacity extends to complex images that humans distinguish on the basis of artistic style: Impressionist paintings by Monet and Cubist paintings by Picasso. We show that honeybees learned to simultaneously discriminate between five different Monet and Picasso paintings, and that they do not rely on luminance, colour, or spatial frequency information for discrimination. When presented with novel paintings of the same style, the bees even demonstrated some ability to generalize. This suggests that honeybees are able to discriminate Monet paintings from Picasso ones by extracting and learning the characteristic visual information inherent in each painting style.”

Wu, Wen, et al. “Honeybees can discriminate between Monet and Picasso paintings.” Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology (2012): 1-11.

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Categories: Papers from 2012
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